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encouraged petraeus to step down after learning of the affair. joining me now is rejeve from "the washington post." good morning to you. do you think general would have step dound if clapper hadn't suggested it? >> good morning, randi. i think pe tratraeus faced withs investigation, faced with officials understanding what has occurred between him and his biographer paula broadwell was left with little choice. with everything i know, i think that resignation would have been something he likely would have suggested himself as well. >> you have written quite a bit about petraeus. how surprised were you when you heard this news? >> profoundly surprised. it didn't seem in character. petraeus was something nr than just a shrewd battlefield tactician, a very capable strategist. for the last several years, he had fashioned himself as a leader of troops who spoke not just about courage on the battlefield but about personal character and virtue, and this was a man who held himself up and wanted the forces under him to hold themselves up to a higher standard. it really -- to all who know him -- and i'v
headquarters in atlanta. >> i'm wolf blitzer in washington. this is cnn's special program, special coverage of america's choice 2012. we're bringing you the story behind the numbers. the demographic breakdown of the president's decisive victory and the implications for the republican party moving forward. >> we're also examining the challenges ahead for the president leading a divided nation and dealing with an immediate fiscal problem facing the country. and his victory speech, the president urged all americans to come together. he said what unites susbigger than what divides us. >> i believe we can seize this future together because we are not as divided as our politics suggest. we're not as cynical as the pundits believe. we are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions, and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. and together, with your help and god's grace, we will continue our journey forward and remind the world just why it is that we live in the greatest nation on earth. thank you, america. god b
." >>> intriguing new twists and turns in the scandal that's gripping washington, indeed the nation and much of the world. the affair that led general dividend petraeus to resign as director of the central intelligence agency. we're finding out that at least one lawmaker here in washington may have learned of it ahead of the president and there are questions about the investigation that led to petraeus' stunning downfall. brian todd's been working the story for us and getting new information. brian, tell our viewers what's the latest? >> we found out that the house majority leader, republican congressman eric cantor, may have found out almost two weeks before the president did. this and other time lines we're following on the investigation have led to genuine anger over why the white house and other top congressional leaders weren't told sooner. a time line cnn has put together shows the republican house majority leader may have known about former cia director david petraeus' extramarital affair before the president did. that's according to aides to congressman eric cantor who tell us he fou
and spending cuts. jill doherty is in our washington bureau. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> jill, both sides have said they are optimistic about a deal here. they're also not budging on some key issues. >> yeah, i mean, there is some room around the edges, but essentially, and this is the the opening gambit, of course. they're both talking about taxes. the president saying -- and revenue. the president saying that he wants more revenue from the wealthiest americans and the republicans and especially mitch mcconnell, who's the senate minority leader, he's taking a tougher stand than even boehner. let's listen to both of those positions. >> let's be clear. an opening bid of $1.6 trillion in new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson/bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate. it's twice as much as the white house agreed to last summer during the debt ceiling talks, and looked at in the context of the spending cuts yet to be implemented, it amounts to about 20 cents in cuts for every new dollar in tax hi
.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. >>> in gaza tonight, the mood is very tense. israeli is poised to begin a ground attack if they get the go-ahead. israel has been pounding gaza with missile strikes in retaliation for ongoing rocket attacks by hamas. we got a notion of how intense the bombing in gaza is, and we were talking to a palestinian man -- excuse me, in gaza and another man in ashkelon. watch. >> when you hear him say that, when you hear him describe the situation where he is, what goes through your mind? >> sorry. carry on with your question. >> we're having -- [ indiscernible ] >> that was mohammed suleman, his connection was cut off a moment or two later. he joins us now. muhammad, you gave our viewers on
as a terrorist organization. should washington be concerned about israel's role in the conflict. >> reporter: anderson, it's impossible to say what egypt's role is at this point. it is not clear at this point if the fiery rhetoric is just rhetoric or if there's something beyond that or prepare for example more drastic measures. i think we'll find out in the days and weeks to come, but people in washington are listening to this explosive rhetoric and they are concerned, but if you look carefully there's not much happening beyond the rhetoric. i don't think egypt can describe this and viewed as extreme, belligerent departure from the past and they certainly haven't taken arms against israel will and providing material support to hamas and they've come out and said loud and clear that we're going to abide by the camp david accords, the peace accords between camp david and israel and these are all early indications that president morsi has taken a calculated decision and not to disrupt the alliances that are in place and it should come as a relief right now to washington and tel aviv and it coul
to these attacks? >> well, first of all, assessments from the ground apparently were not getting back to washington, were not getting high enough. that compound was under surveillance by the local services. benghazi itself is a jungle. all sorts of islamic groups. somebody should have raised the red flag early on and either fortified that consulate or simply closed it. somebody made a mistake. i don't know who that was, whether it was the state department or the cia or the combination of the two. but they probably, in the loit of today, they should have pu pulled out a long time ago and run all these operations -- >> just going on to topic number two, did the obama administration try to mislead us as to the nature of the attack? we all heard what susan rice said. republicans say she tried to pin this all on that terrible video that came out, that anti-muslim video, when she knew at the time it was something more. you've heard all the rumors flying around. what do you think? >> well, first of all, susan rice -- maybe she was misinformed. maybe she's getting unfairly blamed. maybe the cia sent a bad
in washington. >> diplomats in the region and around the world are working hard behind the scenes to stop this from becoming an all-out war. what are you hearing? >> wolf, you mentioned defense secretary panetta traveling in asia. all that way, made the phone call to ehud barak, the israeli defense minister, to talk about the secretary of state hillary clinton firing up the diplomatic phone lines. look at who she's been talking to in the last few days. she's been talking of course to the israelis, the egyptians, the jordanians, the turks, everyone in the region to see what can be done. the state department spokeswoman, victoria nuland today also hitting the message hard, de-escalation. listen to what she had to say. >> in all cases her message has been the same, that we are urging a de-escalation of this conflict. we are urging those countries with influence on hamas and other groups in gaza to use that influence to get a de-escalation. >> wolf, our correspondence as you know across the region, gaza, israel watching this every minute, wolf. >> we're watching it as well. thank you. let's g
this morning. she's in our washington, d.c. bureau. good morning, jill. >> hello, soledad. well, this is it. both sides are going to be there. they're looking at the tone. they're looking at the president, what kind of tone will he set? you have to say that they're coming in both sides with their essential positions intact. all, both sides are saying that there is some room for a compromise. so, the essential thing is how do you compromise? if you look at the positions, let's say, of the republicans, and it's most strongly, as i say, relayed by senator mitch mcconnell, he does not, and they do not, want any tax increases. so let's listen to him first. >> and let's be clear, an opening bid of $1.6 trillion of new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson-bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate, it's twice as much as the white house seemed ready to agree to during last summer's debt ceiling talks and look at it in the context of the spending cuts that are yet to be enacted from the president's other proposal, it a
. >> so i want to bring in suzanne kelli in washington, and, first of all, tell us a little bit about this video that we're seeing. the fbi so far is determined that security has not been compromised. the agents have interviewed petraeus. what does it say here when you have this woman talking about the cia's investigation into benghazi very publicly? >> well, and you heard for yourself on that piece of video, suzanne. this information hasn't been vetted. is this really something that should appropriately be put out in the public arena in the way that it was? that gets to the very nature of why this relationship was really so messy and so complicated and in the end really inappropriate, but, first of all, i want to say that in temz of what she said about libya and the cia taking prisoners there, this is something that the agency, of course, adamantly denies doing, but the issue really is her extraordinary access to petraeus. when a woman like this who has written a book about him, who, you know, talks openly about the close access she has and relationship with him says something like t
have to get you to washington. we have so much news breaking. this is what we call in the news game the stakeout. take a look at four pictures live cameras so near and yet so far from major news that is basically in the cooker, steps away behind closed doors david petraeus is giving testimony to the senate intelligence committee and at the same time at the white house president obama's closed door fiscal cliff talks with leaders of congress is on going. they all have to come out sometime. when they do, we are set with open mics ready to hear what they have to say about the incredibly important and top secret meetings. >>> we think as one might inspect of a military leader turned spy chief general petraeus rnz a thing or two about traveling under the radar and i have to clarify the back-to-back testimony of both the house and the senate is not necessarily about the affair that he has admitted to or the fallout from this affair, but it is more about the attack on the u.s. out post in benghazi, libya. that attack that killed our ambassador and three other americans on september 11th. t
as washington, d.c., predominantly palestinian and employment is bad. globalfirepower.com has called israel the tenth most popular military in the world. compulsory military service. every young person must go into the moilitary for a while and they have a half million that they can call from the reserves very quickly. ground forces also very impressive. if you count the artillery pieces and mortar, you can get 12,000 forces on the ground. 800 aircraft out there, including some 200 helicopters. this is largely what they used to have these strikes within gaza. now, if you look at hamas, their forces are much smaller in terms of their official forces certainly. if you look at people who are really in uniform, soldiers, police, whatever you want to call it. 12,500. they have nothing like the weapons the israelis have. palestinian militants do have lots and lots of rockets. and i want to bring in a model of one of them here. this is a kasam 2. these rockets are popular because they're cheap, they're easy to make out of steel tubes. only weigh 70 to 100 pounds and fueled by commercial grade fert
me from washington. thank you for joining me. >> my pleasure, gary. good to be with you. >> you heard what israeli spokesman had to say there. what's your reaction to what he had to say? >> it's very, very cynical. gaza is the most densely populated area in the world and you have already placed it under siege for years now. the control is very big military control, crossing points, borders, territorial borders and they shoot and bomb and shell at will. and of course the victims are largely if not entirely civilians. men, women, children. over 205 children have been injured, and these are 35 of them babies. out of the 42 killed, mainly women and children. and there are no military people killed after the targeted assassinations. so enough with the spin and trying to present themselves as angels protecting the civilians. the israeli military is using gaza as target practice. they have been shooting, firing at will, and they want the palestinians of gaza to lie down and die quietly. this is absolutely incredible. it's cruel. it's a human tragedy, and israel has to be held accountable. ga
understands things are very divided in washington. he hopes they can. again, i'll let you hear in your own words this is what he told me. >> there is a budget compromise out there for raising revenue and at the same time curbing spending. simpson bowles. you say it is a good starting point but not enough. most elected officials won't go as dpfar as simpson bowles woul because it would hurt, there would be pain. what do you suggest america can do to get the strong economic growth and the high levels of unemployment? what sort of pain should our politicians be saying we should be ready to take? do we eliminate the mortgage interest deduction, do we eliminate things people are used to but need to give up all of the above. all of the above. i think the very -- the genius of simpson bowles is a political issue, namely that you can take this trillion dollars of so-called tax expenditures, and the republicans can look at cutting them as a reduction in subsidies, which in large part they are. the democrats can look at them as a way to increase taxes on upper income groups. now, it strikes me that'
that in just a minute. >>> we want to bring you in live now to washington. you see peter king there, the republican. he just exited a hearing that david petraeus was testifying in. of course, surrounding what happened in benghazi, libya. let's listen to congressman king. >> the original talking points prepared by the cia were different from the ones that were finally put out. as far as general petraeus, his testimony today was that from the start he had told us that this was a terrorist attack, terrorists involved from the start. my questions had a very different recollection of that, clear impression we were given is that the overwhelming amount of evidence is that it was -- rose out of a spontaneous demonstration and it was not a terrorist attack and pointed out the following week when matt olson said it was a terrorist attack and it made headlines because before then, the administration was saying it was not terrorists. it was very cordial, as you will. we all thanked him for his service. i think he has a different impression of the impressions he left on september 14th. >> mr. c
started, and i suspect, suzanne, he will have bipartisan support for that in washington d.c. and he will have a lot of support internationally now that the campaign is over. the big question is whether the iranian government will be willing to come in a serious way to the negotiating table. they have not shown that over the last couple of years. i think the pressure is actually going to be on the iranian government. >> do you think that the economic pressure on iran is coming to a breaking point here, a boiling point, where you will see iran come to the table? >> i think the sanctions are beginning to hit the iranian government very hard. both the e.u., oil embargo, the u.s. central bank sanctions, and just look at the indicators of that. the iranian riel, the -- it has been -- the ranian have been hit hard in their inability to use the world banking system because they've been shut off from that system, and so the sanctions are important because they tell the iranians that they are isolated, that they have very few friends in the world, and that they're essentially operating in a r
getting. they deserve all of us here in washington to be thinking every single day, how can i make things a little better for them. everything we do isn't going to be perfect or that there are going to be big, tough challenges we have to grapple with, but i do know the federal government can make a difference. we're seeing it right now on the jersey coast and in new york. people are still going through a really tough time. the response hasn't been perfect. but it's been aggressive and strong and fast and robust and a lot of people have been helped because of it. and that's a pretty good metaphor for how i want the federal government to operate generally and i'm going to do everything i can to make sure it does. >> thank you, mr. president. and congratulations, by the way. >> thanks. >> one quick follow-up -- >> chris was there when i was running for state senate. >> that's right. i was. i've never seen you lose. i wasn't looking that one time. >> there you go. >> one quick follow-up and then i want to ask you about iran. i just want to make sure i understood what you said. can you envisio
is quite good here and the economy is below 75%. it's twice as big as washington, d.c. under 2 million people there. they're predominantly palestinian and their economy is very bad, unemployment very high. globalfire.com has called israel the tenth most powerful military in the world. why is that? well, let's break it down a little bit. they have compulsory military service there, so they have a lot of troops ready at a moment's notice, 176,000 active troops. they could also draw up a half million from the reserves pretty easily, so that's a robust force out there. look at their attack units here. 3,000 tanks if you add in all the army personnel carriers and artillery units and mortars out there, you have 12,000 ground units here. that's an awful lot, and of course their air force is formidable. about 800 air strikes. this is what they use to strike at gaza. if you look at hamas, in terms of what they officially have in uniform, police, whatever you want to call them, only about 12,500 and they have nothing like the weapons the israelis have. however -- big point here -- palestinian mi
in this washington drama? >> i don't think so. i think benghazi is such a serious scandal and debacle in terms of american foreign policy that everyone wants to get to the answer, including senator dianne feinstein, the democrat from california. as far as those talking points go, it is not at all clear where they were edited. what we do know apparently is that the original determination that al qaeda was involved, or al qaeda affiliated groups was sent out the front door to the cia and went through some sort of editing process, perhaps interagency, perhaps at the white house that still hasn't been answered. what we do know is if the white house wanted to provide the answers, they could have done it before the election and chose not to. let's not forget, of course, general petraeus and his whole personal scandal, debacle, that could also be professional. we still don't know the answers to that. the administration knew of the petraeus investigation. the president claims that he didn't before the election, now we're only learning of it after. >> let's talk a little bit more about susan rice and t
why this conflict came to be, we'll break it down for you. washington still
contributor james spider marks joining us from washington. first of all, lawmakers say they watch this video. they saw the attack from beginning to end, and it even included shots of the ambassador being dragged out from this building here. hard to watch. why didn't this intelligence actually help with the initial response and a potential rescue mission? >> suzanne, you are really getting a tactical view of what occurred, and i don't think there was any debate in any of the discussions over the course of the last two months that this was brutal, that this was very targeted. the issue became what motivated this to occur, and, again, from the outset, i don't think anybody argued that the type of weapon systems that were involved in this attack were pretty sophisticated, so, again, how did this occur? what were the motivations for it. >> what was it the consulate knew about, their surroundings, so they were prepared for these kind of eventualities, who would take the appropriate risk? every time you deploy, any time an ambassador goes anywhere, and you have americans on the ground in foreign co
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)